Tombstone Tuesday: Kinnis and Pocahontas Fritter

FritterGraves

Several weeks ago I came across an entry at Find-A-Grave which intrigued me – Pocahontas McVeigh Fritter who is buried in Franklin County, Ohio.  Both her first name and married name are both a bit unusual – there must be a story there.  Then I found her husband Kinnis buried in Nebraska, several years preceding her death… definitely a story there!

Kinnis Fritter

Kinnis Fritter was born on October 10, 1832 in Virginia.  I believe his father was Enoch (or Enock) Fritter, but the name of his mother is unclear.  Enoch married Polly Knight in 1825 in Virginia, where Kinnis was born, but the History of Fairfield County, Ohio indicates Enoch Fritter married a woman named Elizabeth Courtright.  If so, it’s possible Polly was his mother.

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11 Comments

  1. I am a direct descendant of Kinnis Fritter, and I remember learning somehow that Kinnis actually died of an overdose of laudanum in Nebraska. Could be he fell ill and in those days it was prescribed for many illnesses and little was still known of its danger.

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    • That is very interesting .. thanks for sharing. I was scratching my head about that one too. Thanks so much for stopping by!

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  2. I am also a direct descendant of Kinnis. His son, Martin, was born on Nov. 28 1875 and contrary to the records you saw, did not die. He survived and was my grandfather, He died on October 16, 1941, in Freeport, Ohio. I was born after his death and never knew him. My father, Martin Fritter, Jr., died when I was eight. I know very little about the Fritter side of the family.

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    • Hmm …. I wonder if the obituary got the name wrong — perhaps one of the other children?

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    • There were two Kinnis Fritters – a senior (the one in this arcticle and the one who passed in Nebraska) and a Jr. even tho back in the day I guess they did not refer that way. Kinnis and Pocohantas had a son, Kinnis, and the first Martin, and then Martin Jr. as your refer to as your father, I believe would have been the original Martin’s son.

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      • My line goes: Enoch Fritter/Kinnis Fritter/Kinnis Fritter/James Kilbourne Fritter/Paul Rudolph Fritter/Paula Christine Fritter (me). So if you are descended from Enoch/Kinnis/Martin/Martin/you, then I guess we’d be cousins 🙂

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        • That is encouraging! As for as I know I had only one cousin, with whom the family lost touch over 50 years ago when her father died.

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          • Then you just found your missing “family” on the Fritter side! My grandpa, James Kilbourne, married twice and had 4 children: James (3 children…sorry, we are not in touch a lot, I think 3…2 I am sure of), Anthony (never married that I know of), Mary Neasa (sp) (9 children I know of) and Michael (lost track of him years ago as well.) I have a daughter, Lisa too. Distant cousins, but family nontheless! I am in Columbus, OH where my grandpa lived his life, as did Daddy, Mom, myself and now my daughter.

          • My grandfather and his family lived in Ohio was well. They eventually ended up in IL, where grandfather died. My father & mother met in IL and moved to NJ during WWII. My aunt, Dorothy Fritter Myers, had already moved to New York City. My grandfather’s youngest son, Edward, died in his 20’s. He had one daughter. My aunt had no children.

  3. Perhaps lawyering was in the genes: I am a retired attorney & my son is an attorney.

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    • Sounds like it!

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