Military History Monday: Quattlebaum Military Service

MilitaryHistoryToday’s Military History article continues the story of the Quattelbaum (Quattlebaum) family whose American progenitor, Petter Quattelbaum, arrived in America in October of 1736 (see this past week’s Surname Saturday article here).

Johannes Quattelbaum, son of Petter, had seen action in the Revolutionary War, serving under Brigadier General Francis Marion, a.k.a. the “Swamp Fox”.  His son John was born on December 1, 1774 in the Saxe Gotha Township, two miles north of present day Leesville, South Carolina.   After the war Johannes moved his family to a Dutch settlement on Sleepy Creek, but John returned to his birthplace and married Sarah Weaver on August 5, 1798.

John and Sarah Quattelbaum had five children together before Sarah died on January 6, 1809.  John was left with five young children to raise and the following year he married Metee Burkett, daughter of a fellow soldier who had fought alongside his father Johannes.   He and Metee had four sons.

NOTE: Digging History is now a monthly digital (PDF) magazine.  This article will be included in a future edition of Digging History Magazine. Check out the latest issue here:  www.digginghistorymag.com or try a subscription here.

19 Comments

  1. This is my family, a part of my heritage. I am so proud of my roots. Thank you granddaddy for all the family history lessons.

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    • Glad you enjoyed the article … you should be proud of your heritage!

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      • 👌👍

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    • My material grandfather was Justin Arvil Rushton, his mother was a Quattlebaum. He lived in Saluda county, his brother, Wilber Rushton ran the farm after granddaddy left for Georgetown, SC and also had a construction company. I’m very proud to be a part of the family tree. Granddaddy was such a protectionist, I wouldn’t cut his grass, it was crazy, but I miss him terribly. I lost him in 1989, I was only 19, living on my own trying to make it. The sun rose and set with him in my eyes. We had a great relationship with much love and respect for each other.

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      • What a great story and what a great heritage you have! Thanks for stopping by!

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  2. What was Paul’s middle name?

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    • I never saw a reference to his middle name… kinda curious isn’t it?

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  3. . The first three men mentioned in this article are Petter Quattelbaum (original spelling), Johannes Quattlebaum, and his son Captain John Quattlebaum. They are in order my 6xGreat, 5xGreat, and 4xGreat Grandfathers. The latter a very influential gentleman in the history of South Carolina. Nancy K Quattlebaum & brother Kevin Quattlebaum

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    • Excellent! You come from “good stock” as they say. Thanks for stopping by!

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  4. I’d love to find a Quattlebaum rifle since I am a descendent… Does anyone know where I can find one?

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    • That would be quite a find and if found might be a pretty penny!

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    • The Lexington County Museum in Lexington, SC has a rifle.

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      • The one in the Lexington County Museum is a flintlock. There is also a Quattlebaum sporting flintlock in the Confederate Relic Room in the State Museum in Columbia.

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  5. I live about 2 miles from Captain John Quattlebaum’s old home place. The original house is still standing. It has been moved several hundred yards. You will have a hard time finding a Quattlebaum rifle. My grandfather had several and later, my Uncle Paul Quattlebaum owned them. They were stolen from my Uncle Paul’s house years ago and never recovered. Miss Laura Brodie, who used to live on Captain John’s old home place, owned several of the last known privately owned rifles. Upon her death they were sold at auction to the highest bidder. My family still owns and lives on part of the land that used to be the old Johannes/Captain John/General Paul estate. As a child I used to swim in the creek at General Paul’s old home place and at Captain John’s. The first electricity produced for the Batesburg-Leesville area was produced at Captain John’s. He used to float logs down the creek all the way to Charleston. I’ve heard stories how slaves would float the logs down the creek to Charleston and then would walk home. My Grandfather was E V (Buck) Quattlebaum. He took me to the cemetery to see their graves. He used to take my sister and me hunting and fishing all over the land. It is still “Quattlebaum” land to me and my family. My grandfather taught me about my heritage all my life. Now, it’s my turn. I’m teaching my children and grandchildren of their great heritage. I truly am a proud descendant of a Confederate soldier…and then some!

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    • Thanks for stopping by and sharing. So glad to hear you are teaching your children about your family history.

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  6. Great article I also hail from Quattlebaum my great grandfather was Connie Quattlebaum. I am the first born male from his 2nd daughter. There is Quattlebaum road a cemetery and a church where his only son is buried as an infant “James gary”. I have attended mt Hebron for 6 weeks in a row here in central Arkansas

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    • Thanks for stopping by and sharing!

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  7. Proud Quattlebaum here! Proud today my southern heritage and my family!!

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    • Excellent … and proud you should be! Thanks for stopping by!

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