Feudin’ and Fightin’ Friday: A Bloody One in Arkansas

FeudingFightFridayThe Arkansas feud known as the Tutt-Everett War or the King-Tutt-Everett War or the Marion County War wasn’t over love, money, water or land – it was pure politics and it was bloody.  The Marion County War might be the most appropriate name since it eventually seemed to have involved just about every citizen in the county.

The Tutt family, led by Hansford “Hamp” Tutt, had come to Searcy County, Arkansas from Tennessee sometime in the 1830’s.  The Tutts were members of the Whig Party and wielded political influence in Searcy County.  They were also known to be a rough bunch – gambling, horse racing, fighting and drinking.  Hamp was a merchant and also owned a saloon which served as a local hangout.

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7 Comments

  1. I am related to Hansford Tutt. He was my 4th Great Grandfather. Davis Tutt was my 3rd Great Uncle. He did not have a sister named Lottie. His sisters were Susan, Rachel, Sara, Dulcenia and Josephine. We have heard several different scenarios where Wild Bill supposedly had an affair with one of Davis’ sisters. Some scenarios say it was Dulcenia but she died in 1863. Josephine, however, had two children out of wedlock. They were to have been the children of a man named Lindville. Josephine later married a man by the name of Dr. Simms. She and her husband took her youngest son and they moved out of Marion County. The oldest son, Calvin was raised by Hansford’s wife, Nancy Tutt. It is said that this is the child that is believed to be the son of Wild Bill and that he later became a police officer in Oklahoma City, but there is no proof that Calvin Lindville was actually Wild Bill’s birth son. However, all research indicates that Calvin was in fact a police office in Oklahoma City.

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    • Thanks for reading my blog and sharing your family history … I’ll add your comments at the end of the article.

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    • Mr. Hoop…. Thank you for leaving this comment and clarification. History gets quite foggy over time. I have had an interest in Wild Bill Hickock over the years (his cousin, Guy Butler, was in my great-grandfather’s Civil War regiment) and became friends with Joseph Rosa, now deceased, who was most knowledgeable about Wild Bill. I have some information on Davis Tutt’s relationship with Wild Bill and would be happy to share anything you might be interested in. – Howard Mann

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      • I would love to see more information about Davis and Wild Bill’s relationship if you’re willing to share. I am a related to Hansford Tutt.

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  2. I hate how this says it was over a gambling debt without pointing out that Hickok was the deadbeat.

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  3. For further research on the Tutt family, look up the application that Nancy A. Tutt (wife of Hansford Tutt) filed with the Southern Claims Commission in 1877. The application she had to fill out documents her experience during the Civil War. She sympathized with the North. She states in the application that Davis K. Tutt was conscripted into the Confederate Army. He made his escape from that unit as soon as he could. She also stated that Confederate Rebels came by her property threatening to hang him. For fear of her safety, she fled to Springfield, Missouri. Witnesses said in the document that the Rebels burned down her property after she left. For more details, you can access her claim for free on Fold3.com. Search under Southern Claims Commission Approved Claims, 1871-1880. Her claim number is 2773.

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  4. Actually, Fold3 isn’t free unless you can visit a library that subscribes to it.

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