Tombstone Tuesday: John Wesley Fly

John Wesley Fly was born in Barry County, Missouri on March 7, 1844 to parents Asher Pipkin and Marillay (Cantrell) Fly.  Asher and Marillay were born in Tennessee and John was one of fourteen children born to their marriage. His parents were devout Christians, Asher having first professed his faith in 1840 by joining the Methodist Church and four years later joining the Methodist Episcopal Church. Marillay died in 1860 and Asher married Minerva Doty in 1862 and fathered four children with her.  Meanwhile, the Civil War erupted and the state of Missouri was sharply divided as to its loyalties.  Citizens of Barry County gathered soon after the first shots were fired at Fort Sumter and declared their intentions to remain neutral, fearing civil war could erupt within the borders of their county.  Yet, despite the so-called Gadfly Resolution of 1861 (Gadfly was later changed to Corsicana) the county was indeed divided.     NOTE: This article is being re-purposed and will be included in a future edition of Digging History Magazine. Please check out our new site:  www.digginghistorymag.com.  Samples are available by clicking magazine image.  Regular monthly issues currently available for only $1.99. – Updated...

Tombstone Tuesday: Kinnis and Pocahontas Fritter

Several weeks ago I came across an entry at Find-A-Grave which intrigued me – Pocahontas McVeigh Fritter who is buried in Franklin County, Ohio.  Both her first name and married name are both a bit unusual – there must be a story there.  Then I found her husband Kinnis buried in Nebraska, several years preceding her death… definitely a story there! Kinnis Fritter Kinnis Fritter was born on October 10, 1832 in Virginia.  I believe his father was Enoch (or Enock) Fritter, but the name of his mother is unclear.  Enoch married Polly Knight in 1825 in Virginia, where Kinnis was born, but the History of Fairfield County, Ohio indicates Enoch Fritter married a woman named Elizabeth Courtright.  If so, it’s possible Polly was his mother.   NOTE: This article is being re-purposed and will be included in a future edition of Digging History Magazine. Please check out our new site:  www.digginghistorymag.com.  Samples are available by clicking magazine image.  Regular monthly issues currently available for only $1.99. – Updated 1/20/18....

Tombstone Tuesday: Flavius Terry Laffoon

     Flavius Terry Laffoon was born on July 28, 1833 in Lawrence County, Tennessee to parents Matthew and Elizabeth Murrell Laffoon.  In 1840 Matthew and his family were enumerated in Giles County, Tennessee.  Family historians estimate the family migrated to Arkansas around 1845, but by 1850 Elizabeth was a widow and living with her children in Carroll County, Arkansas.  Nine of her children, including Flavius, were enumerated in the same household that year: Thomas (26); Elizabeth (22); Mary (20); Flavius (17); Edward (16); Lycurgus (14); Gideon (12); Evaline (8); Matthew (5). Flavius married Judia (or Juda) Thomas, daughter of Nicholas and Amanda Thomas, on December 24, 1854 and together they had seven children: Thomas, John, William, Andrew Jackson, Amanda, James and Dora.   NOTE: This article is being re-purposed and will be included in a future edition of Digging History Magazine. Please check out our new site:  www.digginghistorymag.com.  Samples are available by clicking magazine image.  Regular monthly issues currently available for only $1.99. – Updated...

Tombstone Tuesday: The Trials and Persecution of Reverend Joy Hamlet Fairchild (Part One)

“I am either the worst of men, or the most persecuted and injured – either a knave or a martyr. Let the public read my story and judge for themselves.”  J.H. Fairchild, Exeter, N.H., December 1844 While browsing through my list of potential Tombstone Tuesday articles, I stumbled across an interesting story, as they say “ripped from the headlines” of the 1840s and ’50s, about a minister unjustly tried for adultery in the Boston Municipal Court. Joy Hamlet Fairchild was born on April 24, 1790 in Guilford, Connecticut to parents Lewis and Mehitable Waterous Fairchild.  Lewis’ first wife Sarah Waterous was Mehitable’s sister and Joy was the eighth and last child of the second marriage.  Lewis died when Joy was but thirteen months old and credited his mother’s prayers and counsels for his later successes in life — perhaps even his ability to face unthinkable challenges and controversy. NOTE: This article is being re-purposed and will be included in a future edition of Digging History Magazine. Please check out our new site:  www.digginghistorymag.com.  Samples are available by clicking magazine image.  Regular monthly issues currently available for only $1.99. – Updated...

Tombstone Tuesday: Charles C. Mack

Charles C. Mack was born on January 4, 1810 to parents Jesse and Mary Ann (McCollister) Mack in Washington County, New York.  It appears that Charles might have still been living with his parents in 1830, but around 1832-1834 he married Sophia Brown.  Their first son, Jesse William, was born on Christmas Day of 1834.  Three daughters followed: Emily (1836), Sarah (1839) and Emma (1841). Emily died in 1841 at the age of four years, about eight months before Sophia gave birth to Emma.  Sophia died on October 21, 1846 and Charles married a woman by the name of Caroline (maiden name unknown).  In 1850 the Mack family was enumerated in Washington County, but not long afterwards, perhaps around 1852-1853, they migrated west to Minnesota Territory.     NOTE: This article is being re-purposed and will be included in a future edition of Digging History Magazine. Please check out our new site:  www.digginghistorymag.com.  Samples are available by clicking magazine image.  Regular monthly issues currently available for only $1.99. – Updated...

Tombstone Tuesday: Mary Susan Ann Rebecca Yankee Doodle Jay-Ho Bonaparte Dekelter Payne Spencer

I don’t recall exactly how I came across this most unusual name, but knew there must be a story (and I was right!).  There may not be many records which document her life, but I located an article written by her great-granddaughter Dr. Theresa Greene Reed and included in a book about the heritage and history of Amherst County, Virginia. Mary (called Lucy by her slave owners) was born to parents Nathan and Susan Emaline Payne, slaves of Colonel Philip W. Payne of Campbell County, Virginia, on July 12, 1848.  After Colonel Payne died in 1840, she and her mother were sold to Dr. Robert Wingfield and his wife Elizabeth Sisson Wingfield, owners of a plantation in Amherst County.     NOTE: This article is being re-purposed and will be included in a future edition of Digging History Magazine. Please check out our new site:  www.digginghistorymag.com.  Samples are available by clicking magazine image.  Regular monthly issues currently available for only $1.99. – Updated...