Tombstone Tuesday: Zilpha Etta Scott Dockery (1796-1903)

She was born on September 8, 1796 in Virginia and moved with her family to Spartanburg, South Carolina at the age of three, an event she remembered vividly in 1902 when interviewed by the Dallas Morning News.  John Scott was a farmer and the father of three sons and eight daughters. While most of her family appears to have died young, Zilpha would more than outlive all of them, her life spanning three centuries.  When she was born George Washington was serving his second term as the first president of the United States.  Although Napoleon Bonaparte had just married Josephine his rise to power had not yet evolved. “My people were hard-working people,” she declared.  “We worked in the fields with plows drawn by oxen and made crops that way for my father the year before I was married.”1  Her childhood dresses were made of flax cloth, although she fondly remembered the first calico dress she made.   NOTE: This article is being re-purposed and will be included in a future edition of Digging History Magazine. Please check out our new site:  www.digginghistorymag.com.  Samples are available by clicking magazine image.  Regular monthly issues currently available for only $1.99. – Updated...

Tombstone Tuesday: Carbon Petroleum Dubbs (a “for-real” name with a rags-to-riches story)

Carbon Petroleum Dubbs was born in Franklin, Pennsylvania to parents Jesse and Jennie (Chapin) Dubbs on June 24, 1881.  Jesse was born in the same county (Venango) in 1856, around the time the country’s first oil was discovered, and grew up during the early boom years.  It wasn’t surprising that Jesse, son of druggist Henry Dubbs, developed a fascination with the oil industry, nor that he named his son after one of oil’s elemental components.  Carbon later added a “P.” to his name to make it more “euphonious”.  When people began calling him “Petroleum” (perhaps people assumed that’s what the “P” stood for)  the name stuck, thus he became known as “Carbon Petroleum Dubbs” (“C.P.”).   NOTE: This article is being re-purposed and will be included in a future edition of Digging History Magazine. Please check out our new site:  www.digginghistorymag.com.  Samples are available by clicking magazine image.  Regular monthly issues currently available for only $1.99. – Updated 1/20/18....

Tombstone Tuesday: Thomas Jefferson Pilgrim

Thomas Jefferson Pilgrim was born on December 4, 1804 in East Haddam, Connecticut, the first child of eleven born to Thomas and Dorcas (Ransom) Pilgrim.  His family were devout Baptists and T.J. Pilgrim would spend a lifetime devoted to religious education. After receiving his license to preach Thomas entered Hamilton Literary and Theological Institute, part of Colgate University, at the age of eighteen.  Even though his health was delicate he joined a group of sixty colonists and migrated to Texas following the completion of his education. The migrants traveled to Cincinnati by water, via a raft built in two pieces and led by Elias R. Wightman.  The first day was trouble-free although by that night they were cold and wet.  After seeking shelter in an Indian village along the north bank, an old chief had pity and escorted them to a small cabin.     NOTE: This article is being re-purposed and will be included in a future edition of Digging History Magazine. Please check out our new site:  www.digginghistorymag.com.  Samples are available by clicking magazine image.  Regular monthly issues currently available for only $1.99. – Updated...

Tombstone Tuesday: William Cobbledick

   William D. Cobbledick was born in Whitley, Canada in 1849 and moved to Marshall, Michigan with his parents at the age of six months.  While early records for William and his family are scarce, I believe his parents were John and Mary (Derbuiny?) Cobbledick.  Other than the 1870 census the only other family record might have been one for Mary Cobbledick of St. Clair County whose name appears in an 1860 Federal Population Schedule index.  There were other Canadian-born members of the Cobbledick family enumerated in St. Clair County, Michigan that year as well, but no John or William. In fact, there seems to have been a large contingent of the Cobbledick family members who had migrated to America as evidenced by compiled census records at Ancestry.com.  The surname  originated in England, but as of 2014 only 737 people in the entire world bore the name (South Africa – 274; Australia – 156; England – 151; Canada – 83; United States – 72; Latvia – 1).1   NOTE: This article is being re-purposed and will be included in a future edition of Digging History Magazine. Please check out our new site:  www.digginghistorymag.com.  Samples are available by clicking magazine image.  Regular monthly issues currently available for only $1.99. – Updated 1/20/18....

Tombstone Tuesday: Joseph Faubion, the man who “died twice”

Joseph Faubion was born in Clay County, Missouri on September 7, 1842 to parents Moses and Nancy (Hightower) Faubion.  Moses was first married to Patsy Holcomb, and after she died he married Nancy Hightower in 1841.  According to the 1850 census Nancy was nineteen years younger than Moses and Joseph appears to have been their first child. According to census records the family resided in Clay County where Moses was a farmer.  When the Civil War broke out, Joseph and his brother Jacob joined the Missouri Cavalry to fight as Confederates.  It appears that Joseph enlisted in Clay County on August 13, 1862.  A very faint and hard-to-read record seems to indicate he may have been a prisoner of war, but I’m not entirely sure the record is his because of the details to follow.   NOTE: This article is being re-purposed and will be included in a future edition of Digging History Magazine. Please check out our new site:  www.digginghistorymag.com.  Samples are available by clicking magazine image.  Regular monthly issues currently available for only $1.99. – Updated...

Tombstone Tuesday: Tonsillitis Jackson

I know, I know – you probably think this story belongs in the Far-Out Friday category.  Yet, it’s truly true there was a person named Tonsillitis Jackson.  I ran across the name while researching another Tombstone Tuesday article (another unusual name – stay tuned!). Tonsillitis Jackson was born to Emsy (named spelled “Emgibe” on a government record) and Eddie (Basfield) Jackson of Oklahoma on November 7, 1932.  It seems Tonsillitis received his unusual name because his mother had a sore throat at the time.  Two years later the Jacksons had another son and named him Meningitis.   NOTE: This article is being re-purposed and will be included in a future edition of Digging History Magazine. Please check out our new site:  www.digginghistorymag.com.  Samples are available by clicking magazine image.  Regular monthly issues currently available for only $1.99. – Updated...