Happy New Year: New (Ad)ventures on the Way Soon!

Happy New Year . . .  and with the new year come new (ad)ventures!  Digging History will be “going digital” by mid-January (if all goes as planned).  What does “going digital” mean?  (Update:  looks like it will be sometime Tuesday, January 16 for opening day!) Digging History will be publishing a monthly digital history magazine packed with an eclectic mix of articles and topics.  Digging History has always tried to focus on the unusual, unique and unheard-of stories which are not found in history books and that tradition will continue with Digging History Magazine.  After purchasing you’ll be able to download a copy to your computer, tablet or phone to read and enjoy at your leisure. There will be a new web site: www.digginghistorymag.com (still under construction).  Here you’ll be able to purchase monthly issues, beginning with January 2018.  Also available will be special editions which are dedicated to one particular theme.  For example, an “Early American Faith” special issue will be available and focus on a series of articles and essays previously published on the Digging History blog (with some new content).  Another special issue entitled “Genealogy and the Census” is also planned, with more to come. While early on most articles will be written by Publisher and Editor Sharon Hall, the goal is to garner interest from other lovers of history who would like to write and share these same kind of stories.  If you have a story to tell, contact us and let’s discuss.  In addition to serving as publisher/editor of Digging History Magazine, Sharon also serves as Editor for the award-winning newsletter of the South...

Felonious Females: “Badger Girls”

  No one seems to know for sure where the term “badger game” originated.  Perhaps it was so-named because it had its origins in Wisconsin, the Badger State, or perhaps it was named after a rather cruel sport called “badger baiting”.  Badger baiting appears to have originated in England during the nineteenth century.   Without going into the sordid details, this blood sport pitted a badger, normally a docile creature, against a dog (some dogs were bred as “badger dogs”). Stories began appearing in American newspapers in the early to mid-nineteenth century.  Even into the early twentieth century the so-called “badger game” was still popular and most profitable, hardy despite its age, according to Duluth News-Tribune (01 Oct 1922).  The con game had ousted card sharping as the number one “indoor sport” on trans-Atlantic ocean liners.  The game was played best, however, when a couple worked together. NOTE: This article is being re-purposed and will be included in a future edition of Digging History Magazine. Please check out our new site:  www.digginghistorymag.com.  Samples are available by clicking magazine image.  Regular monthly issues currently available for only $1.99. – Updated...

The cows can’t get used to it and the milk trains won’t wait (the history of Daylight Saving Time)

Today most of America simply moves their clocks up one hour in March and sets them back one hour in November (or in this day and age, your digital devices reset it for you).  Thereafter, there are few, if any, references to Standard or Daylight Saving Time.  However, back in the early twentieth century it was a HUGE deal and not without controversy.  In many ways it was city dwellers vs. rural America. In the eighteenth century, Benjamin Franklin wrote an amusing tongue-in-cheek essay, entitled “An Economical Project for Diminishing the Cost of Light.”  In the essay he essentially proposed that instead of using candles or oil lamps for light in the mornings that natural sunlight be used instead.   Franklin, on the night previous, had seen a demonstration of an oil lamp and he began to think in terms of economy and thrift.  Was the price of the oil to fuel the lamp worth the cost? When he posed the question to his hosts at the demonstration of the oil lamp, he apparently gave them something to ponder: I was pleased to see this general concern for economy, for I love economy exceedingly. NOTE: This article is being re-purposed and will be included in a future edition of Digging History Magazine. Please check out our new site:  www.digginghistorymag.com.  Samples are available by clicking magazine image.  Regular monthly issues currently available for only $1.99. – Updated...