Monday Musings: Don’t You Just Hate When That Happens

Here are a few items that caught my eye of late while clipping newspaper articles.   One astonishes (that anyone made it through alive!), one will make you wince, the others may just give you a chuckle to start your week — oh, and a little European and literary history thrown in for good measure. As I write today’s article on Sunday evening we are having our third straight night of storms.  The first night the wind just blew HARD, almost tearing a couple of tomato plants out of the garden and breaking off a stem or two.  Last night the rain came down in sheets with winds of probably at least forty miles per hour (or more).   I was afraid the garden would be devastated but it actually weathered the storm pretty well, all things considered. This article is no longer available at this site.  However, it will be enhanced and published later in a future issue of Digging History Magazine, our new monthly digital publication available by individual purchase or subscription.  To see what the magazine is all about you can preview issues at our YouTube Channel.  Subscriptions are affordable, safe and easy to purchase and the best deal for getting your “history fix” every...

Monday Musings: Harry R. O’Brien, Plain Dirt Gardener

It was such a beautiful Sunday – not too hot and not too cool (or windy) – that I decided to work in the garden after church.  With the abundant rain we received last week (Thank You Lord!) I had to re-work some of the rows I had already dug after they more or less washed out.  I had several tomato and pepper plants to put in the ground … we now have 26 or 27 tomato (I lost count) plants – ‘cause we love tomatoes in our house! I picked up another blister or two, started on my summer tan and wore myself out, but in a good way.  I love to get out and dig around, play in the dirt if you will – so relaxing and satisfying.  Not that I claim to be an expert gardener, but I give it my all.  I was thinking about what to write for today’s article and reminded of someone whose story I was introduced to recently. This article is no longer available at this site.  However, it will be enhanced and published later in a future issue of Digging History Magazine, our new monthly digital publication available by individual purchase or subscription.  To see what the magazine is all about you can preview issues at our YouTube Channel.  Subscriptions are affordable, safe and easy to purchase and the best deal for getting your “history fix” every month....

Monday Musings: My, How Things Have Changed (Or Not)

Excuse Enough To Swear While researching a story for an unusual name (Purkaple), I came across an article in the Chanute Daily Tribune (19 Feb 1912).  It seems Dudley L. Purkaple of Denver was in a St. Joseph, Missouri restaurant when he spilled a hot cup of coffee in his lap.  He was arrested and hauled before a judge.  Was it illegal to spill hot coffee in one’s lap (ouch!)? No, but it was illegal to swear.  Purkaple admitted to using bad language, “but, your honor, I could not help it.  I spilled a cup of steaming hot coffee all over my trousers and under the stress of great pain and much embarrassment I swore I begged the pardon of the restaurant man, but a policeman arrested me.” This article is no longer available at this site.  However, it will be enhanced and published later in a future issue of Digging History Magazine, our new monthly digital publication available by individual purchase or subscription.  To see what the magazine is all about you can preview issues at our YouTube Channel.  Subscriptions are affordable, safe and easy to purchase and the best deal for getting your “history fix” every...

Monday Musings: Washing the Pearline Way

While researching a few days ago, I ran across an advertisement in the May 26, 1893 issue of the Jasper Weekly Courier (Missouri).  The headline caught my eye – “When you’re Rubbing” – accompanied by a picture of woman in various positions over a washtub and washboard.  It was a bit intriguing because I wasn’t exactly sure what was being advertised. The ad referred to “Pearline’s way of washing” – what was “Pearline’s way”?  Was it an actual product or some kind of technique to make wash day (usually Monday) a breeze?  It was one of many clever advertisements printed in newspapers and magazines all over the United States in the late nineteenth century and early twentieth.  New York businessman James Pyle was the manufacturer and his ads usually ended with an admonition to accept no imitations. If a peddler or “unscrupulous grocers” purported to sell something that was as good as Pearline, that would be FALSE, for you see “Pearline [was] never peddled”, a recurring tagline for the product that must have been their motto: The rest of the advertisement extolled the virtues of the multi-purpose product.  For all cleaning purposes, dissolve a tablespoonful of Pearline in a pail of water (more if hard water); warm water worked the best, but wasn’t required – just don’t use soap!  Instructions were include to make a “soft soap” – a pound of Pearline in a gallon of boiling water, add three gallons of cold water, stir and voilá Soft Soap. Pearline was appropriate for washing clothing of the finest fabrics to flannel; for washing dishes it was “magical”; cleaning paint,...

Monday Musings: Crazies, Black Sheep and Murderers (Oh My!)

  Let’s face it — everyone has relatives they’re not necessarily proud of.  Harper Lee, author of acclaimed novel To Kill A Mockingbird, said it best: You can choose your friends but you sho’ can’t choose your family, an’ they’re still kin to you no matter whether you acknowledge them or not, and it makes you look right silly when you don’t. Last week I wrote an article entitled “Are We All Cousins?“.  In the article I illustrated an instance of pedigree collapse in the Hall line and mentioned “an anomaly of sorts on the Strickland side.” Mary Angeline Hensley was both my great-great grandmother and my great-great-great aunt (if my calculations are correct). My three-times great grandmother Eliza Boone (Mary Angeline’s mother) married James Henry Hensley at the age of eighteen in 1855.  Eliza was born in Rankin County, Mississippi and she and James were married in Lafayette County, Arkansas. This article has been enhanced and published in the May 2018 issue of Digging History Magazine.  Preview the issue here or purchase...

Monday Musings: Are We All Cousins?

Have you ever thought about how many ancestors one person could possibly have?  Mathematically speaking, taking one’s family tree out thirty generations would result in about a BILLION ancestors.  Taking it out forty to fifty generations would result in approximately a TRILLION ancestors — more people than have EVER lived on the earth! Of course, that has never happened (or ever will), but why is that?  The answer is pedigree collapse. This article was enhanced and published in the May 2018 issue of Digging History Magazine.  Preview the issue here or purchase...