Early American Faith: The Wild Man of Goose Creek

By the late eighteenth century John Wesley’s Methodism, having spread to the American colonies, was formally established as the Methodist Episcopal Church in Baltimore in 1784.  While the Congregationalists and Episcopalians remained along the Eastern seaboard of America, Methodism began to spread with the push into uncharted territories to the west. Methodists weren’t shy about their faith as circuit-riding preachers accompanied patriots who received land grants for their war service, crossing the mountains and heading to Tennessee and Kentucky.  Often the first person settlers met along the way was a man on a horse with a Bible in his hand.  While Francis Asbury is widely credited as the most famous circuit rider and responsible for Methodism’s early exploding growth (1784-1816), there is another man who made his mark in a much briefer period of time (1800-1804). John Adam Granade, a descendant of French ancestors . . . NOTE:  This article will soon be available in a Special Edition of Digging History Magazine.  If interested, please subscribe to the blog (to the right of this post) and you will be notified when both regular and special edition issues of Digging History Magazine are available. Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to email this to...

Early American Faith: Reverend Ezra Stiles

The subject of today’s Early American Faith article was a minister, a lawyer for a brief time, one of the founders of Brown University, the president of Yale University and an aspiring scientist who corresponded with Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin.  His list of accomplishments are many; Edmund Sears Morgan called him “the gentle Puritan”. Ezra Stiles was born on November 29, 1727 to parents Reverend Isaac and Kezia (Taylor) Stiles in North Haven, Connecticut. . . NOTE: This article will soon be available in a Special Edition of Digging History Magazine. If interested, please subscribe to the blog (to the right of this post) and you will be notified when both regular and special edition issues of Digging History Magazine are available. Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new...

Early American Faith: Reverend Jonathan Lee (Part One)

I came across Reverend Jonathan Lee’s tombstone recently  – the impressive epitaph definitely caught my eye: In Memory of the Rev. Jonathan Lee, this Stone, the fruit of conjugal affection and filial gratitude, is erected. He was born July 4 AD 1718; Graduated at Yale College, 1742; was a settled minister in the Gofpel in this town 45 years; and died Oct. 8 AD 1788, in the 71 year of his age. NOTE: This article will soon be available in a Special Edition of Digging History Magazine. If interested, please subscribe to the blog (to the right of this post) and you will be notified when both regular and special edition issues of Digging History Magazine are available. Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new...

Early American Faith: Pardon Tillinghast

Pardon Tillinghast was born in the 1620’s in Streat, Sussex, England.  Most historians believe he was born in 1622 but a baptismal record indicates he was baptized on January 2, 1625.  He was the son of Pardon and Sarah (Browne) Tillinghast and his paternal grandparents were John and Alice (Pardon) Tillinghast. NOTE: This article will soon be available in a Special Edition of Digging History Magazine. If interested, please subscribe to the blog (to the right of this post) and you will be notified when both regular and special edition issues of Digging History Magazine are available. Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new...

Early American Faith: Reverend Abner Reeve and His All Too Human Struggles

Reverend Abner Reeve was the father of Tapping Reeve, profiled in yesterday’s Surname Saturday article.  Abner was born in 1708 in Southold, Suffolk, New York, the son of town blacksmith Thomas and his wife Bethia (Horton) Reeve. NOTE: This article will soon be available in a Special Edition of Digging History Magazine. If interested, please subscribe to the blog (to the right of this post) and you will be notified when both regular and special edition issues of Digging History Magazine are available. Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new...

Early American Faith: Pennepack Baptist Church and Its Dramatic Founding

It is still an active congregation in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, founded in 1688.  It was the eighth Baptist church founded in America and today is the seventh oldest still surviving.  Its founding emanated from the dramatic conversion of its founding pastor amidst the most unconventional and unusual circumstances I’ve ever heard of.  Read on. NOTE: This article will soon be available in a Special Edition of Digging History Magazine. If interested, please subscribe to the blog (to the right of this post) and you will be notified when both regular and special edition issues of Digging History Magazine are available. Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new...