Digging History Magazine: Free Issue to Try (One Day Only!)

Free Issue – Hurry! From 12:01 a.m. Wednesday, January 31 until 12:00 a.m. Thursday, February 1 (CST) receive a free copy (not just a sample) of January’s inaugural issue.  Enjoy reading it on your computer, tablet or phone (PDF).  February’s issue will go on sale just after midnight on February 1 and the January issue will then sell for its regular price of $2.99.  To receive your copy, go to the magazine’s contact page here.  Provide your name and email address and in the message box type “Free Copy”.  Please also let us know if you are interested in becoming a regular subscriber of the magazine.  Note:  Wednesdays are quite busy for me, but as long as you email before the deadline you will receive your free copy. By the way, here’s what people are saying since the launch on January 15: “Don’t know how I found it but really enjoyed it. I love to find the background story of ancestors. Just finding birth and death date does nothing for me. Can’t wait for the next issue!” “I started reading the magazine late last night😊 Love it! Layout looks great, font size is perfect, and content keeps me wanting more!” “I found the contents fascinating and learned some useful information.” “Just read the whole enchilada.  So good.  Loved it.” “I love your articles, and am currently reading the Early American Faith special edition that I purchased this week. Please let me know – I’d be a subscriber in a heartbeat!” Subscriptions Regarding the last comment, subscriptions will be added soon, which will make it even easier and more convenient...

Fifty Out of Seven-Point-Six Billion

I just looked up the world’s estimated population as of December 2017 — 7.6 billion! So, what does “fifty out of seven-point-six billion mean?  For Digging History that is how many dedicated history lovers I am looking for who will commit to helping me keep afloat while building a customer base for Digging History Magazine.  Or, maybe you’re a friend — or even a stranger — who just wants to help one of your fellow 7.6 billion human beings find success. Fifty out of 7.6 billion really isn’t a lot, is it?  Certainly not, but it would mean a LOT to Digging History because at least 50 purchasing customers per month for the remainder of 2018 represents the means to cover monthly operating expenses for site hosting and various fees.  Fifty dedicated customers is, of course, just the first (modest) benchmark.  I’ll also need folks to spread the word to expand the magazine’s influence.  (By the way, if you’re not interested in purchasing a magazine you can still help.  Click the “Donate” link above and you’ll still be supporting Digging History.) What is Digging History Magazine? Beginning in late 2013 and through the early part of 2016 hundreds of articles were posted at the Digging History blog site (where you are right now).  I love researching and writing the articles but I’d like to receive some compensation for my efforts, so I decided the best avenue to accomplish that would be to digitize Digging History.  The magazine also gives me more latitude to be creative in layout and presentation.  All articles are accompanied by footnotes and sources, where appropriate. ...

Digging History Magazine: Try a Sample Before You Buy

Digging History is converting to a monthly digital magazine format (PDF).  The first issue of Digging History Magazine is now on sale for $1.99.  If you’d like to try a sample, download it here. Our first Special Edition is also available.  Early American Faith is a compilation of both previously-published at Digging History and newly-written articles with an extensive bibliography and priced at $3.99.  Download a sample here. Like what you see?  Purchase, checkout, wait for your email and download the entire magazine to enjoy on your computer, laptop, tablet or phone!  Plus, each purchase you make between now and March 31 results in an entry to win one of three prize packages (see Special Offers). Cheers, Sharon Hall, Publisher and...

Believe it or not . . . stranger things have happened (Can’t Mail Kiddies)

On January 1, 1913 the United States government began parcel post service throughout the country, based on a zone system which would determine how much postage would be charged for a particular package. Eleven pounds was the weight limit for a single package and basically anything that did not injure other mail could be sent. . . The new parcel post system was making headlines around the world. . . folks were so excited about the prospect.  Then, someone tried to mail a child. For the rest of the article, purchase the January issue of Digging History Magazine here...

Philatelic Genealogy: What is it and how can it help me find my ancestors?

As a child you may have been a philatelist without knowing the official term. Stamp collecting has long been a popular hobby.  It was (and still is) a great way for young and old alike to learn more about the world. The word “philately” is the English version of a French word coined by a man named Georges Herpin in 1864. Herpin took the Greek root word “philo” which refers to love or appreciation of something, and combined it with the word “ateleia” which refers to “exempt from duties and taxes”. . . . Genealogists know that Bible records, wills and old letters can be a gold mine of family history. In regards to old mail, philatelic genealogy also looks at the outside of the envelope to glean genealogical information. . . For the rest of the article, which includes actual examples of combing through old letters to find family history “gems”, purchase the January issue of Digging History Magazine here ($1.99)....

Brick Walls: Despise Them or Conquer Them

Whether you’re an amateur or a seasoned genealogist, you have inevitably run into what is called a “brick wall”. If you primarily use the internet for research, it’s easy to blame it on Google, but sometimes it has nothing to do with search techniques, but a mindset that may need some adjustment — or a change in strategy. For instance, and I’ve encountered this myself, we rely too much on family “lore”. Let’s face it, some family stories were just that — stories (and perhaps outright stretches of the truth!). Too much reliance on those stories may have you “barking up the wrong tree.”. . . Try a “Back Door” Approach Awhile back I was researching family history for a friend who was adopted by his aunt and uncle. He knew his mother but didn’t know much about his father (but did know his name). After a brief conversation with his wife at church one Sunday, I set out on a quest to find out all I could about his father and his family. What I found was a family tragedy related to a volatile time in United States history on the border between Texas and Mexico.  To read the rest of this lengthy and informative article, purchase a copy of the January issue of Digging History Magazine here ($1.99). P.S.  This article in the magazine is followed by a short article on effective Internet search...