Ghost Town Wednesday: Eastonville, Colorado

GhostTownWednesdayWhile many of Colorado’s ghost towns were formerly booming mining towns, this one east of the Black Forest near Colorado Springs was an agricultural community.  The area began to be settled in 1872 and was first called Easton when a post office was established at Weir’s Sawmill.

In 1881 the Denver and New Orleans Railroad, later the Colorado and Southern Railroad, began to lay track in the area.  A train stop named McConnellsville was established a few miles northeast of Easton in 1882.  The residents of Easton decided to move their town there in a “relocate or perish” action (Colorado Ghost Towns: Past and Present by Robert L. Brown, p. 93).

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6 Comments

  1. Is there an effort to restore or at least stabilize the standing church?

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    • Agreed. That is a shame. 🙁

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    • No, the owners don’t appear to be interested. It’s a travesty.

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    • The church was burned by an arsonist in the late 1960s. The building you show pictured was a small home, which has currently collapsed. There is a new house built on the site of the former Presbyterian Church, which is 1/4 mile from the building you are talking about.

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  2. Where is the church located?

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    • It is on the south side of Sweet Road, between Eastonville Road and Elbert Road. I drive past it quite often — the last time being this afternoon. Unfortunately, it appears that yesterday’s massive wind storm collapsed the roof, and the structure looks *VERY* unstable at this point :-\

      I’m not sure why, but there is also an old Cog Railway car on the abandoned Colorado & Southern railbed near the church.

      Reply

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