Ghost Town Wednesday: Kimberly, Utah

KimberlyUtahKimberly, Utah, located in the northwest part of Piute County, began to be settled in the 1890’s.  In 1888 prospectors came to the Tushar Mountains to find a storied lost mine called “Trapper’s Pride.”  It may not have been the mine they were searching for, but the men discovered two large veins of both gold and silver and founded the Gold Mountain Mining District in April of 1889.

The Annie Laurie Mine, named after Newton Hill’s daughters, was opened in 1891 and became one of the most productive in the mining district.  Another prospector, William Snyder, developed the Bald Mountain Line.  The town site he founded was first called Snyder City, later changed to Kimberly after an investor from Pennsylvania, Peter Kimberly, bought the Annie Laurie and other area mines.  He combined all his holdings into the Annie Laurie Consolidated Mining Company and constructed a cyanidation plant to process the gold.

AnnieLaurieMine1917With the mill in place and the abundance of gold, silver and other precious metals, Kimberly began to boom.  The town was divided into Lower Kimberly and Upper Kimberly, the lower part being the business district and the upper residential.  In the book A History of Piute County by Linda King Newell (1999), Lower Kimberly is described:

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7 Comments

  1. I spent many summer days roaming Kimberly with my family.

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    • Thanks for stopping by!

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  2. Do you happen to know who owns the mines now and how to get ahold of them?

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    • Sorry, no. Thanks for stopping by!

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  3. My 14 year old great-grandfather spent a winter in one of the Annie Laurie mines turning a rubber conveyor belt once a day so it wouldn’t crack. Any idea if it is still possible to visit the old mines?

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  4. how does this town look like now?

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